Plaintree Farms appoints new manager

8 May 2006

Plaintree Farms is delighted to announce the appointment of Mr Ged Parker as the new Stud Manager of Plaintree Farms.

We believe that Ged is a rare find indeed: a genuine hands-on horseman with a deep understanding of the international thoroughbred industry.

Ged has moved to Plaintree from New Zealand, where he has lived for the past six years with his wife and young family after they were forced to flee Zimbabwe during the bitter political unrest.

Ged first joined Westbury Stud as a stud groom when he first arrived in New Zealand. He then proceeded to work his way through the ranks until he was appointed Broodmare Manager and second-in-charge to the Manager.

During that time, he was closely involved in the relocation of Westbury Stud from Cambridge to its new location near Karaka, Auckland, where a multi-million dollar showcase farm has been built from scratch.

Ged, who is Scottish born – and complete with Scottish brogue – has a long and accomplished career as a horseman. He spent most of his adult life in Zimbabwe, where he worked as a trainer with up to 60 horses in work at Borrowdale Racecourse, Harare. He also coached apprentice jockeys for the Jockey Club of South Africa.

Ged is an extremely accomplished horseman in his own right. He twice represented Zimbabwe in show jumping and continued to compete in both eventing and show jumping in New Zealand, where he most recently competed at the World Cup Qualifier Show in Auckland. He is also a registered course builder with the NZ Equestrian Federation and was vice-President of the local Pony Club.

Ged is married to Marisa, who has been closely involved in thoroughbred breeding throughout her life, and the couple have two daughters, Roxanne and Savannah, who are both competitive riders.

We are confident that Ged will prove a fantastic asset both to Plaintree Farms and to the wider Australian thoroughbred industry. He is a hard-working and devoted family man, he is great company – and he is committed to his horses with the passion that only a true horseman understands.

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A canter is a cure for every evil.

—Benjamin Disraeli